THE OPEN SOURCE INTEGRATOR FOR ENTERPRISE

Docker with Liferay DXP

What is docker?

Docker containers wrap a piece of software in a complete filesystem that contains everything needed to run: code, runtime, system tools, system libraries – anything that can be installed on a server. This guarantees that the software will always run the same, regardless of its environment.

There are so many advantages using Docker, one for example is that the new members in a development team can easily build a local environment without spend a lot of time. With this in mind, this article shows how to build a MySQL and Liferay DXP development environment with Docker.

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Summary Grassroot Smart Cities

Introduction

Cities are complex systems, characterized by massive numbers of interconnected citizens. In the advent of new technologies, such as IoT or mobile applications, various domains within these systems can be enhanced to support the decisions of its citizens, businesses, or administration.

Ideally, a city follows a vision how to improve its smartness to generate value for its citizens. However, this top-down approach is often not applied consequently in many cities. Reasons are a reluctance to invest in new approaches due to a critical financial state or a conservative view averse to an approach that makes only sense regionally. A typical city already manages a big portfolio of IT solutions and it’s difficult to know in advance, what technologies and innovations will be used by end users.

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Components and usage of Spring Data Elasticsearch (Part 2)

In the previous post we discussed how to read data in chunks from a relational database as a Spring Batch process using Spring Boot runner. This post will explain how to import that data into Elasticsearch.

Spring Boot provides out of the box support for Elasticsearch that saves a lot of configuration time so we are going to take full advantage of that. However, in real world application, you will need to use the Elasticsearch Java Client that requires additional instantiating and configuring. When no configuration is provided, the Spring Boot integration for Elasticsearch will automatically create an embedded Elasticsearch instance which is very useful for testing….

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Spring microservices monitoring: /metrics endpoint and ELK

Introduction

On the actual vibe of microservices using, it becomes more and more necessary to monitorize the health of our distributed systems. Here we will expose a few ways to do it, concentrating us in Spring boot applications. Hands on!

Current tools available

On the ELK community already exist two easy solutions to poll for the /metrics endpoint – the Logstash Http_poller input plugin and the community beat springbeat. Both work on a similar way (configure a URL and voilá! data is forwarded to Elasticsearch) but in different contexts, the former is a plugin part of Logstash, while the latter is an independent beat application. And both seem to be nice options, if we want to know the state of microservices with a defined URL or a single instance or if we use a service discovery with a gateway pattern, i.e. zuul+Eureka. And both share the same limitation: There is no way to configure service discovery to poll for all the instances of a service (As of now…). Whether or not this limitation is a problem, depends on what we want and what we have. Do we have a single instance of each microservice? or if we have multiple instances, do we want to know the general aggregated state of them? (I would put an alarm here, because some data is tightly coupled to the instance or it’s JVM and aggregating it might be a problem). An option to solve this limitation is to write a little client, a Spring boot application that will use the service discovery provided by Spring Cloud Eureka to get all the instances, poll them, process data, and forward it to the ELK stack.

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Performance considerations when using Apache Kafka with SSL/TLS

Running a cluster of a distributed software such as Apache Kafka in a production environment will lead to operational concerns. One of these concerns is certainly security. Companies have varying guidelines and policies when it comes to security. This depends on various factors for example the type of application data that the system is processing or in which network infrastructure the system is running and what security concerns this zone implies on the servers that are running within.

A probable scenario is that such a cluster is run in an environment which dictates restrictiveness in regards to access control and protocol security. Access control means that identified clients communicate with the cluster only. When looking at protocol security the company or project might have a guideline that clients must use a secure protocol like SSL/TLS. Furthermore, communication among the cluster servers itself might also have to be secured.

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